Posts Tagged ‘injury’

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Considering the subzero temperatures lately in the Tri State region, we felt it appropriate to discuss ice and its many benefits after injury.  Following an injury, regardless of how minor or severe the injury is the use of ice is often recommended. In order to make better decisions regarding the use of ice, it is important to understand how body tissue reacts to ice and treatment length.

The use of ice causes several changes within the body. Two important effects are the narrowing of capillaries to decrease swelling and decreasing the sensation of pain. When ice is applied to the skin local vasoconstriction or the narrowing of blood vessel occurs due to a reflex action of local smooth muscle. In the case of immediate injury there will be a decrease in the swelling. However, if swelling is already present ice cannot help reduce it.

Ice helps decrease the sensation of pain. This occurs by the cold decreasing the nerve’s ability to respond to stimuli, which increase the pain threshold of the individual. The area being iced does not automatically achieve this state of numbness. There is a progression in sensation from feeling cold in the beginning, to a mild burning, to aching, and finally numbness. The progression through these stages can take about twelve to twenty minutes. The recommended treatment time for ice ranges from twenty to thirty minutes in order to prevent undesired effects.

It is important to note that when using ice for treatment times should not exceed 20 minutes every hour or more because of a complication associated to over exposure to the subfreezing temperatures known as frostbite. Another complication that can occur is a nerve paralysis when cold is applied to nerves that are close to the surface of the skin.

The use of ice after injury has been shown to help decrease swelling by causing local blood vessels to narrow, as well as decrease the sensation of pain. When ice is coupled with rest, compression, and elevation many of the negative components of injury can be reduced. 

Daniel Rodriguez, ATC

Head Athletic Trainer New Rochelle High School

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I am often asked about the use of alternative medicine and treatment methods for soft tissue injuries.   Patients may struggle to get back to their normal daily activities or sports in a short period of time after an injury.   Several medications, herbal supplements, and treatment methods out there claim to increase the healing rate of your body, including low level laser therapy.  Today, we will discuss LLLT more in depth.

Low level laser was approved by the FDA in 2002.  It is an application of non-thermal light to an injured area in order to stimulate changes at the cellular level.  The absorption of light energy by the tissue is thought to improve muscle and bone repair, reduce pain, and decrease inflammation.  It does this without heating up the tissue.

Because of its mechanism, LLLT may have the best effect on chronic pain and soft tissue injuries such as rotator cuff tendonitis, plantar fasciitis, or long term muscle pain (trigger points).  Treatment should last 5-10 minutes and has minimal side effects.  Laser may not be indicated for all patients such as those that are pregnant or going through active cancer treatments.

The research on the use of laser for treatment of injury is still inconclusive, which is why it is not covered by most health insurances. While alternative treatment methods may claim to heal injuries in a fast and efficient time period, the best results tend to be when they are included in a comprehensive treatment plan put together by your physical therapist.

Call us today if you are experiencing chronic pain from a particular injury because we can help.  We have two offices conveniently located in Pelham (914-738-1748) and White Plains, NY (914-610-3881).

Kevin Trexler, DPT

 

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I am often asked about the use of alternative medicine and treatment methods for soft tissue injuries.   Patients may struggle to get back to their normal daily activities or sports in a short period of time after an injury.   Several medications, herbal supplements, and treatment methods out there claim to increase the healing rate of your body, including low level laser therapy.  Today, we will discuss LLLT more in depth.

Low level laser was approved by the FDA in 2002.  It is an application of non-thermal light to an injured area in order to stimulate changes at the cellular level.  The absorption of light energy by the tissue is thought to improve muscle and bone repair, reduce pain, and decrease inflammation.  It does this without heating up the tissue.

Because of its mechanism, LLLT may have the best effect on chronic pain and soft tissue injuries such as rotator cuff tendonitis, plantar fasciitis, or long term muscle pain (trigger points).  Treatment should last 5-10 minutes and has minimal side effects.  Laser may not be indicated for all patients such as those that are pregnant or going through active cancer treatments.

The research on the use of laser for treatment of injury is still inconclusive, which is why it is not covered by most health insurances. While alternative treatment methods may claim to heal injuries in a fast and efficient time period, the best results tend to be when they are included in a comprehensive treatment plan put together by your physical therapist.

Call us today if you are experiencing chronic pain from a particular injury because we can help.  We have two offices conveniently located in Pelham (914-738-1748) and White Plains, NY (914-610-3881).

Kevin Trexler, DPT